Kogashi Ramen - The pasta that catches fire

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Did you know that there is a ramen that catches fire literally? Today we are talking about the Kogashi Ramen known as the fire ramen. Kogashi can literally mean burnt or toasted, this is because the ramen broth is set on fire and poured over the noodles. The chef literally sets his plate on fire to create this delicious new recipe.

There are thousands of varieties of ramen in Japan, the restaurant Gogyo in Tokyo he was one of the main responsible for cooking this new idea. Each bowl of ramen is set on fire for a while leaving the broth very dark. Although it looks burnt, the taste is delicious and unique. Ramen can be prepared with miso or shoyo soup.

Gogyo's restaurant is very spacious and has a great appetizer menu and delicious sake. My friend Rodrigo Coelho had the chance to visit this delicious restaurant in Roppongi, so I will share with you the video with all his experience below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6TgV3UvYdg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PP_n_jk9WVg

Kogashi Ramen - On fire everywhere

O kigashi ramen it can be found elsewhere in Japan. Of course they are never the same, the ingredients, preparation methods and the chef's hand are totally different. One of the kogashi ramen popular in Japan is also in Kyoto in the restaurant called men Baka Ichidai.

The restaurant of Gogyo it also appears to have opened at other locations in Kyoto and Nagoya. This idea of burning the ingredients of the dishes with a flame of fire is not unique. We have already enjoyed this in drinks and also in some Chinese dishes. There are other flaming Japanese dishes that cannot go unnoticed.

Kogashi ramen - o prato que pega fogo

Teppanyaki, hotete and saganaki are just a few dishes that the Japanese decided to set on fire and make a spectacle. If you know another burnt delicacy from Japan, comment below. We appreciate the shares and comments. We recommend reading: