Goya Chanpuru - A bitter dish from Okinawa

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Goya Chanpuru is a typical Okinawan dish that consists of a goya stew with pork and tofu. Not everyone likes it since goya is very bitter, much worse than jiló.

Goya can be known in Brazil by the name of nigauri, nigagori, bitter melon or mormódica. And the word Chanpuru means mix. The name nigaiuri means cucumber bitter. 

It is possible to find this Goya throughout Japan and even in Brazil, especially in the summer. This bitter vegetable is the fruit of an Asian cucurbitaceae (Momordica charantia), with eastern India and southern China as a possible origin. Today it is widely cultivated around the world precisely for the value of its immature and bitter fruits.

Goya chanpuru – um prato amargo de okinawa

In addition, goya has many beneficial properties for those who consume it, decreases the blood sugar rate for diabetics, assists with digestive problems, is an anti-inflammatory, and even prevents cancer, among others. It is not for nothing that they say that one of the reasons for the longevity of Okinawa is due to this cucumber. This recipe is still composed of pork that contains vitamin B6 and B12.

Recipe 

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium goyas or nigauri;
  • 2 eggs
  • 150g of pork (can be bacon or ham, or even other meat.)
  • 200g of tofu;
  • 1 onion cut into slices;
  • 1 teaspoon of sake
  • 1 spoon of sugar
  • 2 miso spoons
  • Shoyu and seasoning to taste;
  • A little hondashi (powdered fish stock)

Preparation mode: 

  • Cut the Goya long, remove the seeds, wash well and cut into small half-moon;
  • Wrap the tofu in a paper towel. Place on a plate and microwave for 2 to 5 minutes at high power. Remove the damp paper towel and wrap it in a dry one. Cut into 2 to 3 cm cubes;
  • Break the 2 eggs and beat lightly;
  • Cut the pork or ham in strips;
  • In a bowl, mix the miso with sugar, sake, soy sauce, hondashi and add water until it forms a paste that is neither thick nor thin;
  • Bring a large skillet to high heat and heat with a little oil. Pour the eggs and make a scrambled egg, don't fry too much;
  • Now with a little more eye, add the tofu, until golden on all sides;
  • Do the same procedure by frying the meat, then sauté the onion and the goya, until withering a little, and go throwing the miso paste on top;
  • Then mix it up, and create your Chanpuru. (Mixed)

Goya chanpuru – um prato amargo de okinawa