Japan foods, soy products

Do you know the products and foods from Japan that are derived from soy? Everyone knows that soy offers countless health benefits, so the Japanese can keep your skin fresh and pass 100 years.

Soy is a food that does not please most, either by taste, or by widespread testimonials. The fact is that this does not happen in Asia and especially in Japan.

Soy in Japanese it is called daizu [大豆] and is very present in Japanese cuisine. In this article, we will also mention other foods that are not of Japanese origin but that are soy-based.

Shoyu - Japanese Soy Sauce

Shōyu [醤油] is a sauce made from a mixture of soy, roasted cereal, water and sea salt and is present in almost all Japanese cuisine. There are several types of soy sauce, from sweet to salty.

Shoyu soy sauce can be used for dessert, meat, Sushi, rice, anything. In Japan, several products are created using the shōyu as an ingredient, even chocolates and snacks.

Japan foods, soy derivatives

Natto - Fermented Soy

Natto (なっとう or 纳豆) - Natto is made from fermented soybeans and is characterized by a strong smell and sticky appearance. This is a food widely consumed in Japan, especially for breakfast, mixed with white rice and raw egg. It is very rich in protein, and was a great source of nutrition in feudal Japan.

Natto is made from fermented soybeans and is characterized by a strong smell and sticky appearance. This is a food widely consumed in Japan, especially for breakfast, mixed with white rice and raw egg. It is very rich in protein, and was a great source of nutrition in feudal Japan.

Japan foods, soy derivatives

Tofu - Soy Cheese

Tofu (豆腐) - it is a food produced from soy. It has a firm texture similar to that of cheese, delicate flavor, creamy white color and appears in the form of a white cube.

It is even called soy cheese. The manufacturing process is based on soy milk. In Asian cuisine, tofu is used in all kinds of recipes, both sweet and savory. It can be eaten raw, fried, cooked in soups or sauces, steamed, stuffed with different ingredients, or fermented like pickles.

Missoshiru - miso soup

Miso soup (味噌汁 | missoshiru) - It is a dish commonly consumed frequently by the Japanese. It is usually prepared with soy, hondashi, tofu, chives; sometimes other vegetables are added.

Misoshiru is served before the main course and should be eaten warm. The word Miso Soup has as meaning fermented soy broth, formed by two words where mission means “fermented soy” and shiru, "broth".

This is one of the healthiest dishes in Japan and is part of the Japanese diet for breakfast, lunch and dinner. There are variations with pork called tonjiru and many others, all of which are juicy and delicious.

Japan foods, soy derivatives

Other soy products

Soy milk - It is a drink made from soy beans. It helps to reduce body fat and is an option for those who have problems with cholesterol or milk allergy. It may not be very popular in Brazil, but in Japan it has an even high consumption, both pure and culinary.

Edamame (枝豆) - Literally Green Soy, is a preparation made with soy beans still in the pod, usually found in Japan, Hawaii, China and Korea. The pods are boiled in water along with condiments (like salt) and served whole.

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Okara - It is not really a food, but it is a residue that remains from the process of creating soy milk, or other vegetable milks. After the creation process, the fiber and some residual nutrients remain in the filter of the soy milk machine, giving rise to okara. Okara can be used to enrich soups, add to the dough, meatballs, hamburgers and other foods.

Tempeh - it is a fermented food with a fungus of the genus Rhizopus, from white soybean seeds from Indonesia, with a nutty aroma and a dense and slightly fleshy texture. It is a strong food, with a more intense flavor than other soy derivatives.

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Well, that's just the basics, because basically in most Japanese recipes and foods, you use something based on soy, even if it's shoyo or tofu. Thus making soy an indispensable ingredient in Japanese cuisine.

It's amazing how the Japanese are able to do something that I particularly think is bad, in a tasty and delicious food. What do you think of soy in Japanese cuisine? We appreciate your comments and shares.

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